“A Rainbow of American Piano Music” performed by Richard Cameron-Wolfe on a multi-city Russian tour

Date: 

Oct 10 2011 - 8:00pm
Pianist-composer, Richard Cameron-WolfePianist-composer, Richard Cameron-WolfePianist-composer Richard Cameron-Wolfe will embark upon a multi-city Russian concert tour this autumn between October 10 and November 9, performing a program entitled “A Rainbow of American Piano Music” with repertoire including three native-born composers – Charles Griffes, William Flanagan, and Charles Ives; plus three émigré American composers – Leo Ornstein (Ukraine), Dane Rudhyar (France), and Thomas de Hartmann (Russia). Cities thusfar confirmed for Cameron-Wolfe’s tour are Nizhny Novgorod (as part of the Glinka Conservatory's 65th anniversary celebrations), Astrakhan, Novosibirsk, Omsk, and Moscow.

In addition to performing, Cameron-Wolfe will be lecturing on American music and attending performances of his compositions. In Nizhny Novgorod (called “Gorky” during the Soviet era), a new arrangement of his 2009 work “Roerich Rhapsody” will be premiered, in a version for cello and bayan (the Russian button accordion).

In Astrakhan, his flute and piano composition “Lapis Lazuli” will have its first performance outside the United States.

Cameron-Wolfe’s lecture will include composers Edward MacDowell, Charles Ives, Charles Griffes, Henry Cowell, Aaron Copland, Ruth Crawford (Seeger), Harry Partch, Elliott Carter, John Cage, Lou Harrison, Milton Babbitt, Morton Feldman, George Crumb, Morton Subotnick, Terry Riley, and Charles Wuorinen. (A follow-up lecture, featuring more recent composers, is scheduled for 2012.)

In May of this year, Cameron-Wolfe previewed his piano concert in Zhitomir, Ukraine at the third annual “Musical Spring” Festival. His most recent composition, “Lilith”, for violin and piano, had its world premiere at the Festival, in a concert at the Soviet Museum of Cosmonautics. “What an honor that was,” commented the composer, “hearing my music in a museum dedicated to space exploration, with a sputnik and satellite prototypes suspended above the musicians!”